GODS PROJECT
GODS PROJECT
GODS PROJECT
GODS PROJECT
GODS PROJECT
GODS PROJECT
GODS PROJECT
GODS PROJECT
GODS PROJECT
GODS PROJECT
GODS PROJECT
GODS PROJECT
GODS PROJECT
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GODS PROJECT

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THE GODS PROJECT


Origins :

 

Anubis (/əˈnjbɪs/;[2] Ancient GreekἌνουβις), also known as InpuInpwJnpw, or Anpu in Ancient Egyptian (Copticⲁⲛⲟⲩⲡromanized: Anoup), is the god of funerary rites, protector of graves, and guide to the underworld, in ancient Egyptian religion, usually depicted as a canine or a man with a canine head.[3]

 

In Greek mythologyMedusa (/mɪˈdjzə, -sə/Ancient GreekΜέδουσαromanizedMédousalit.'guardian, protectress'),[1] also called Gorgo, was one of the three Gorgons. Medusa is generally described as a human female with living venomous snakes in place of hair; those who gazed into her eyes[2] would turn to stone. Most sources describe her as the daughter of Phorcys and Ceto,[3] although the author Hyginus makes her the daughter of Gorgon and Ceto.[4]

 

Odin (/ˈdɪn/;[1] from Old NorseÓðinn) is a widely revered god in Germanic paganismNorse mythology, the source of most surviving information about him, associates him with wisdom, healing, death, royalty, the gallows, knowledge, war, battle, victory, sorcery, poetry, frenzy, and the runic alphabet, and depicts him as the husband of the goddess Frigg. In wider Germanic mythology and paganism, the god was also known in Old English as Wōden, in Old Saxon as Uuôden, in Old Dutch as Wuodan, in Old Frisian as Wêda, and in Old High German as Wuotan, all ultimately stemming from the Proto-Germanic theonym *Wōðanaz, meaning 'lord of frenzy', or 'leader of the possessed'.

 

Poseidon (/pəˈsdən, pɒ-, p-/;[1] GreekΠοσειδῶν) is one of the Twelve Olympians in ancient Greek religion and mythology, presiding over the sea, storms, earthquakes and horses.[2] He was the protector of seafarers and the guardian of many Hellenic cities and colonies. In pre-Olympian Bronze Age Greece, Poseidon was venerated as a chief deity at Pylos and Thebes, with the cult title "earth shaker";[2] in the myths of isolated Arcadia, he is related to Demeter and Persephone and was venerated as a horse, and as a god of the waters.[3] Poseidon maintained both associations among most Greeks: He was regarded as the tamer or father of horses,[2] who, with a strike of his trident, created springs (the terms for horses and springs are related in the Greek language).[4] His Roman equivalent is Neptune.

 

Ra (/rɑː/;[3] Ancient Egyptianrꜥ; also transliterated rꜥw /ˈɾiːʕuw/; cuneiform: 𒊑𒀀 ri-a or 𒊑𒅀ri-ia;[4] Phoenician: 𐤓𐤏,[5] romanized: rʿ) or Re (/r/Copticⲣⲏromanized: ) was the ancient Egyptian deity of the Sun. By the Fifth Dynasty, in the 25th and 24th centuries BC, he had become one of the most important gods in ancient Egyptian religion, identified primarily with the noon-day sun. Ra ruled in all parts of the created world: the sky, the Earth, and the underworld.[6] He was believed to have ruled as the first pharaoh of Ancient Egypt.[7][8] He was the god of the sun, order, kings and the sky.

 

Zeus (/zjs/; Ancient Greek: Ζεύς)[a] is the sky and thunder god in ancient Greek religion and mythology, who rules as king of the gods on Mount Olympus. His name is cognate with the first syllable of his Roman equivalent Jupiter.[2]

Zeus is the child of Cronus and Rhea, the youngest of his siblings to be born, though sometimes reckoned the eldest as the others required disgorging from Cronus's stomach. In most traditions, he is married to Hera, by whom he is usually said to have fathered Ares, Eileithyia, Hebe, and Hephaestus.[3][4] At the oracle of Dodona, his consort was said to be Dione,[5] by whom the Iliad states that he fathered Aphrodite.[8] According to the Theogony, Zeus' first wife was Metis, by whom he had Athena.[9] Zeus was also infamous for his erotic escapades. These resulted in many divine and heroic offspring, including Apollo, Artemis, Hermes, Persephone, Dionysus, Perseus, Heracles, Helen of Troy, Minos, and the Muses.[3]

 

 

Made of the best PVC quality in the market, these patches comes with velcor hook backing for easy carry on any loop velcro surfaces.

 

Sizes :

ANUBIS : 4"h X 3"w

MEDUSA : 3,75"h X 2,75"w

ODIN : 3,5"h X 3"w

POSEIDON : 4"h X 3,25"w

RA : 3,5"h X 3,5"w

ZEUS : 4"h X 3,25"w


Notice : To be weared only if you believe in gods ! :)